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An Article Written by Tony (in Chinese, 2015)
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Tin-Yau



Joined: 19 Aug 2012
Posts: 1089
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2015 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also a big thank you to you Tina!
You guys are so busy trying to keep us ignorant friends (regarding the chinese language) up to date. salute
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Eri



Joined: 28 May 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2015 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hanasan wrote:

Yes, agree. And further more, we can only try to express the meaning clearly but can't avoid losing the beauty of the Chinese language after translation. It's really difficult to find suitable words for those Chinese idoms and phrases.

But it's really amazing that you can complete the translation so quick because Chinese is also foreign language for you!


Fortunately, we are also using traditional Chinese Characters (sometimes a little different thou) in Japanese, and I studied basic language structures, so I can understand when I read. (Of couse, more specialized subjects are harder to understand) However, readnig, understandnig the meaning and translation are two different things. Sometimes it is very difficult to find suitable words.
I usually keep the nuance of how I get when I read, therefore may not be exactly right words. Wink
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Eri



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2015 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://variety.com/2015/film/asia/i-am-somebody-review-derek-yee-shanghai-film-festival-1201519295/

Derek Yee pays tribute to the extras of the mainland Chinese film industry in this empathetic but overlong ensembler.

Maggie Lee
Chief Asia Film Critic
@maggiesama
The extras take the lead in :I Am Somebody,; a bittersweet drama that depicts young migrants・ dreams of stardom at China・s Hengdian World Studios, the so-called Hollywood of the East. Sprinkled with insider knowledge on the the nation・s booming film industry, the pic confirms Hong Kong helmer-thesp Derek Yee as an empathetic, insightful voice who cultivates characters living on the fringe. However, whatever his good intentions, Yee trumpets his motivational messages in an overtly preachy way, and the yarn is far too long and distended. The decision to cast only bona fide extras and shoot from their perspectives presents a challenge in terms of attracting mass audiences locally and abroad, though the film・s steady supply of cameos by Hong Kong A-listers should help.

Yee boasts an illustrious showbiz heritage: His parents (Yee Kwong and Hong Mei) and his elder brothers (Paul Chun and John Chiang) are all distinguished actors, and he himself shot to instant fame with his third film, Chor Yuen・s :Death Duel; (1977). Since then he held his own as one of Shaw Brothers・ top four martial-arts superstars, until he turned his hand to directing in 1986. Considering the parallels between China・s meteoric rise to become the world・s second biggest film market and Yee・s emergence during the heyday of Hong Kong moviemaking, his 16th directorial effort offers a personal take on the ups and downs of an industry that can be as magical as it is merciless.

Yee may not have firsthand experience as an extra or bit player, but after spending four decades interacting with these anonymous troopers, he probably appreciates the degree to which a production hinges on their collective contribution. To pen the script, he reportedly spent two years collecting real-life stories in and around Hengdian, the biggest studio on the globe, situated in a small town in the eastern coastal province of Zhejiang. Part of his research has been shaped into a documentary, :I Am Nobody,; which will be released in close proximity to the fiction feature.

Peng (Wan Guopeng), the son of a woodcutter living in the boondocks of wintry Dongbei province, has buried his head in Stanislavsky・s books since graduating from school. One day, he finally leaves with his parents・ reluctant blessing and about $160 in pocket change, and ventures to the so-called :Dream Factory,; which has churned out more than 1,000 film and TV productions since 1994. Like every country bumpkin visiting the big city, he・s out of his depth but soon finds his footing among like-minded heng piao (Hengdian drifters), wannabes of assorted backgrounds and ambitions who have come from all over China to get their foot in the door of the industry.

As Peng・s first pedicab ride around the studio unearths worlds within worlds on a site as big as Universal and Paramount studios combined, the initial hour or so opens a fascinating window onto the mainland casting system and the way extras are deployed on a shoot. Naturally, the tricks of their trade (playing a corpse earns more, playing a palace maiden requires total immobility) and their sob stories offer the greatest interest, but a dash of humor or even slapstick might have pepped up the mood, which is too earnest and verges on melodrama.

A bevy of characters and couples are introduced, and the film explores their work attitudes and romantic dilemmas with warmth and credibility. The men tend to have their heads in the clouds, such as Wei Xing (Wei Xing), whose ego keeps him from taking menial parts; good-looking Zhao (Wang Zhao), whose cynicism has turned him into a slacker; and Kai (Shen Kai), who puts his passion for acting before the needs of his pregnant wife, Xiaoqin (Xu Xiaoqin). The women, on the other hand, are tough as nails, whether dealing with a casting-couch situation or weighing their career ambitions against their marriage options.

As with the underdogs and working-class heroines in Yee・s :Lost in Love; and :C・est la vie, mon cheri,; what inspires admiration about this film・s characters are their quixotic ideals, as well as their courageous ability to face the music. They speak for young Chinese from other walks of life, who are adrift yet still harbor the elusive dream of becoming :somebody,; as seen in a wrenching scene in which one extra crumbles under pressure when given the role of a lifetime. However, Yee・s tendency to moralize eventually flattens the characters・ complexity, as when the whole ensemble reaffirm their passion and dreams in one stiffly theatrical scene, as if they were reciting creeds. The narrative has also trouble sustaining its anecdotal nature over the mammoth 139-minute running time.

It seems that, after his extensive research, Yee had trouble pruning his material and making sense of his characters・ disparate experiences. Sadly, most of the leads here don・t have the charisma or the acting chops to pull off their roles. The screen really lights up when Hong Kong stars like Anita Yuan and Alex Fong make their cameo appearances, ironically reinforcing that there・s a reason why most extras don・t break out of their ranks.

Wan, whose goofy image somewhat recalls comic actor Wang Baoqiang, is likable enough in the lighter scenes, but when emotional intensity is required, his expressions are so unskilled and exaggerated that they raised unintentional chuckles among viewers at the screening attended. The romance between Wan・s Peng and another extra, Ting (Wang Ting), is also rather cliched, but Wang・s fresh face and artlessness earn her credibility.

Craft contributions are solid but not particularly stylish. Lenser William Chan Wai-lin presents a comprehensive view of Hengdian, but apart from conveying its vast size and the dazzling variety of sets, he hasn・t quite visualized the site as a star in its own right. Although Derek Hui is one of Hong Kong・s most cutting-edge editors, his pacing here is surprisingly run-of-the-mill and lacks the necessary momentum.

Film Review: 'I Am Somebody'
Reviewed at Shanghai Film Festival (opener), June 12, 2015. Running time: 139 MIN. (Original title: "Wo shi lu ren jia")
Production
(China-Hong Kong) A Zhejiang Bona Film and Television Prod. Co., Huaxia Film Distribution Co. (in China)/Distribution Workshop (in Hong Kong) release of a Zhejiang Bona Film and Television Prod., Bona Film Group, Film Unlimited (China) presentation of a Film Unlimited production. (International sales: Distribution Workshop, Hong Kong.) Produced by Mandy Law, Peggy Lee. Executive producers, Yu Dong, Mandy Law, Jeffrey Chan.
Crew
Directed, written by Derek Yee. Deputy directors, Lo Chi-leung, Lee Kwong-yiu. Camera (color/B&W, widescreen, HD), William Chan Wai-lin; editor, Derek Hui; music, Peter Kam; production designer, Ben Luk Man-wah; art director, Wu Zhen; costume designer, Pang Yat-sang; sound (Dolby Digital); re-recording mixer, Ken Wong; visual effects supervisor, Enoch Chan; visual effects, Herbgarden, Blink Prods.; action directors, Zhu Feng, Shi Xiaogiong; line producers, Man Cheuk-kau, Jennie Luk; assistant director, Sean Liu.
With
Wan Guopeng, Wang Ting, Lin Chen, Xu Xiaoqin, Shen Kai, Hao Yifan, Hao Yifei, Tan Peijun, Zhang Xilai, Wang Zhao, Wei Xing, Geng Lishu, Lin Jian, Derek Yee, Anita Yuen, Fang Ping, Alex Fong, Daniel Wu, Stephen Fung, Felix Chong, Alan Mak, Ann Hui. (Mandarin, Cantonese dialogue)
FILED UNDER: Derek Yee I Am SomebodyShanghai Film Festival
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Tin-Yau



Joined: 19 Aug 2012
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2015 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the article Eri.
I`m looking forward to see if my opinion is the same as the critic`s. Wink
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Eri



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2015 11:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also wondered "is the movie about extras should be particularly stylish ?"

If this movie was so stylish, how could it be possible to show the life of unknown actors and actresses ? Shocked
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Tin-Yau



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right, sometimes I wonder what film critics expect if they see a movie. Especially one like that. To them it seems not enough if one does a decent job. Everything has to be "out of this world".
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Safran



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks, dear Eri flower
I'm looking forward (curious about) to reading first impressions /reviews from fellow-fans Wink ...... Please let us know Smile
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yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
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Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Eri Razz .
I hope this film will attract many movie goers, for the positive message it carries. Or one should just go, to listen to the sound made by meteors. I will go see it if it ever makes to the US movie theaters, or have to patiently wait for the release of the DVD Very Happy .
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Jamaica



Joined: 27 Mar 2011
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Location: Lexington, KY United States

PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2015 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for translating Tony's article, Eri! I really enjoyed it!
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Jamaica



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2015 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to Tina, as well, for the translation. (And Tony's right, about the sound of the meteors. Where I grew up, in Colorado, it was a great place to watch and hear the August meteor showers!)
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Info



Joined: 27 Jan 2003
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

梁朝偉的信 - 陳淑莊/四十筆畫

張國榮曾經在清談節目中提起有次跟劉嘉玲和兩個朋友打牌,梁朝偉在客廳看書,忽然說要為大家泡茶。我記得張國榮大概這樣說:「然後佢捧住茶具出來,好認真叫大家聞下有幾香,又說香氣要點分辨,我哋覺得佢好無聊,一啖飲晒繼續打牌。」

那時候梁朝偉在拍王家衛的戲,而劉嘉玲間中被傳媒拍到深宵夜蒲,梁朝偉總是不在左右。再聽張國榮的描述,我一直幻想梁朝偉好像武俠小說中獨來獨往的隱世高手。

最近網上流傳一則據說是梁朝偉寫的電影觀後感。話說爾冬陞的新戲《我是路人甲》舉行了試映會,事後收到一位觀眾的看後感,那位觀眾正是梁朝偉。

觀後感的文字很流暢,形容橫店某一夜的獅子座流星雨,連流星的聲音都寫得細緻動人。我有些文化界朋友熱烈討論,我們這位影帝是否還有不為人知的寫作才華,於是我的腦海就出現張國榮說梁朝偉在麻雀枱附近看書的記憶。

《我是路人甲》勾起了梁朝偉的回憶,他回憶起入行前賣電器,被周星馳拉去加入藝員訓練班,所以偉媽好嬲周星馳。梁朝偉說從此他一心一意要做一個好演員,他在觀後感中寫道:

「我不會做別的,從我入行那天起,就有一個強烈的執念伴隨我,就是:不管我的角色是甚麼、戲份有多少,哪怕只給我一秒鐘的鏡頭,我也要想辦法讓你在這一秒鐘內記住我。」

他講得出做得到,他在《阿飛正傳》出場才兩分鐘,就只是着衫、食煙和梳頭的動作,廿五年霎眼過去,但看過的觀眾念念不忘。

梁朝偉今天貴為國際級影帝,蜚聲國際,成就他的除了演技之外,還有他作為職業演員所追求的清晰目標:用心把戲演好。名和利這些透過演戲而來的利益,不應該是好演員追求的主體目標,所以他肯定地說:「我想要成為一名演員,不是明星,不是影帝,就只是演員。」

原文轉載自第497期 U Magazine 專欄
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TonyGrrl



Joined: 31 Mar 2015
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very many thanks for the translation. You have made me very happy to be able to read Tony's words. Wink
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