TONYLEUNG.INFO
Discuss Tony Leung with fellow fans!
 
Welcome to the Discussion Board

 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist    ProfileProfile    Log inLog in   RegisterRegister 
  Log in to check your private messages Log in to check your private messages   
Click here to go to Archival Tony Board (2003-2012)

Celebrating 20 Years of ITMFL
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.tonyleung.info Forum Index -> Tony Leung Movies
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 6:11 am    Post subject: Celebrating 20 Years of ITMFL Reply with quote

Today, 20200520, marks the 20th anniversary of "In The Mood For Love" world premiere at the Cannes International Film Festival. The following day, Tony won the best actor award for his portrait in this movie king Applause .

Start with 2 pix posted by Jettone on Weibo today Very Happy . While the first one is self-explanatory, the second is a never seen before pic from WKW's collection, taken on the first day of filming ITMFL.




Last edited by yitian on Wed May 20, 2020 6:41 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cannes Stories
By David Hudson
On Film / The Daily — May 14, 2020
https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/6946-cannes-stories


Tony Leung Chiu-wai in Wong Kar-wai’s In the Mood for Love (2000)

Wong Kar-wai aims to begin shooting Blossoms, an adaptation of Jin Yucheng’s 2012 novel, in July. For Variety’s Rebecca Davis, this news is “the latest indication that film production in mainland China is revving back up again after coronavirus closures.” The novel, which has won a good number of top literary prizes in China, is set in Shanghai, where Wong was born, and spins a series of interwoven tales over the course of two periods, the first stretching from the 1960s through the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976, and the second spanning the boom years from the 1980s to the year 2000.

Profiling Jin for That’s Shanghai last year, Dominic Ngai notes that in the preface to Blossoms, “Jin compares the final scene of Wong’s Days of Being Wild (1990), where Tony Leung appears as an unnamed character (later introduced as Zhou Muyun in In the Mood for Love) counting banknotes and combing his hair for a night of gambling, to the corrupted, money-driven society that Shanghai has become since the economic boom. This ‘cameo’ likely paved the way for his collaboration with the celebrated filmmaker.” Jin says that Wong has told him that “he was really moved by the book, and said that the characters’ experiences reminded him of what his brother and sister had been through.” At the Film Stage, Jordan Raup has reported that Wong has said that Blossoms would be a third installment in a story begun with In the Mood for Love (2000) and 2046 (2004).

When In the Mood for Love premiered in Cannes twenty years ago, Alejandro González Iñárritu and his wife, unable to find a taxi, raced on foot—he in a tux, she carrying her high heels—to catch the screening. After the credits rolled, “Maria and I walked in complete silence for almost ten minutes,” he tells New York Times film critics Manohla Dargis and A. O. Scott. “We suddenly stopped by the sea. Maria hugged me and started crying inconsolably on my shoulder. And I did the same on hers. In the Mood for Love had left us speechless and deeply moved. It was that moment that reminded me why, even when it’s so stupidly difficult sometimes, I wanted to become a filmmaker.”

Iñárritu’s is one of nearly two dozen Cannes stories Dargis and Scott have gathered, and what comes through loud and clear in this marvelous collection is just how sorely the festival is being missed this year. One of the most moving stories is told by Alice Rohrwacher, who cast her father’s sworn enemy, Carlo Tarmati, in The Wonders (2014). “And then,” she says, “during the screening, Carlo and my father recognized themselves in the story. They laughed and cried together. They were afraid together. They loved the work we had all done together. At the party after the screening they teased each other. In a few days, they were best buddies, inseparable.” More anecdotes, memories, and reflections come from Josh and Benny Safdie, Wes Anderson, Clint Eastwood, Jia Zhangke, Claire Denis, Kleber Mendonça Filho, Abel Ferrara, and so on, and so on. “A year without Cannes is a sterile year,” says Christophe Honoré. “No need to deny it. It is a hole, a void, an inconsolable absence.”

On Tuesday, the day that the seventy-third edition would have opened, Dargis and Scott took part in an informal roundtable with the NYT’s awards season columnist, Kyle Buchanan. “Whether it’s the festival’s repudiation of Netflix, or the way Cannes grapples with the #MeToo movement and gender parity, the controversies on the Croisette can be instructive,” writes Buchanan. “It seems strange to say I’ll miss all that, but I find that Cannes holds a chic, cracked mirror up to Hollywood, and I always leave with a new perspective on what I’m returning to.” David Ehrlich, taking part in a similar exchange with fellow IndieWire writers Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson, agrees. “Yes, it’s stuffy and draconian and resistant to change even when it represents progress, but the fact that the festival is stuck in the past is also what gives Cannes its power,” he writes. “Being at Cannes is a kind of cinephilic ecstasy that’s hard to describe, and impossible to equal.”

And evidently, it always has been. In a dispatch to Esprit from the second edition of the festival in 1947, André Bazin, the renowned critic who would go on to cofound Cahiers du cinéma a few years later, described feeling out of place on the Croisette among the tanned, the beautiful, and the rich. “It was then that the critic realized that cinema was a dream,” he wrote in the piece translated by Sis Matthé for Sabzian, “because it is nothing but a ‘dramatization’ of the realization of a desire. At the cinema, no woman, no matter how beautiful, is forbidden since you are Clark Gable, Humphrey Bogart, or Spencer Tracy . . . For those who do not participate in it, the reality of luxury naturally provokes the painful awareness of being banned. Its cinematographic dramatization, on the contrary, equals its realization and the euphoria of possession. But it was time for the screening. The critic, his skin still white, only had time to get dressed and run off to the cinema.”
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How Wong Kar-wai’s In the Mood for Love became a modern masterpiece – 20 years after it premiered

Starring Tony Leung and Maggie Cheung, critical response to the film back in 2000 was initially muted, even though the director’s Chungking Express (1994) had been praised by the likes of Quentin Tarantino; today though, In the Mood for Love is regarded by many as one of the greatest films of the 21st century so far

Douglas Parkes
Published: 6:00pm, 18 May, 2020

https://www.scmp.com/magazines/style/article/3084877/how-wong-kar-wais-mood-love-became-modern-masterpiece-20-years


Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung are the stars of Wong Kar-wai’s 2000 hit movie In The Mood for Love. Photo: handout

Wong Kar-wai’s In the Mood for Love premiered at Cannes on May 20, 2000. At the time, the critical response was somewhat subdued. Variety called it “an exquisitely fashioned melodrama” while simultaneously declaring that, like much of the director’s work, it had “more style than substance”. The Economist – with an attitude that showed why it would take another 20 years for an Asian film like Parasite to win big at the Oscars – declared that, with its 98 minutes duration, In the Mood for Love was merely “orientalism lite” before extolling other films ignored by the festival jury that it said were “the uncrowned kings of this 53rd Cannes festival”. Except who remembers Harry, a Friend Who Wishes You Well or I Prefer the Sound of the Sea in 2020? The Guardian barely had time for In the Mood for Love at all, merely noting in its round-up that Tony Leung Chiu-wai’s award for best actor was “well deserved”.

Here in 2020, the view looks quite different. In the Mood for Love is now viewed as a modern masterpiece. A BBC poll from 2016 ranked it the second greatest film of the 21st century until that point, saying “never before has a film spoken so fluently in the universal language of loss and desire”. Sight and Sound’s prestigious Greatest Films of All Time critics’ poll, last conducted in 2012, placed In the Mood for Love 24th, making it not only the highest ranked film of this century but of any film created between 1980 and 2012.

However, this cinematic gem had a surprisingly troubled creation. In the press kit for its Cannes premiere Wong stated, “Filming In the Mood for Love has been the most difficult experience of my career”.

The origins of In the Mood for Love date back to before the 1997 handover of Hong Kong from Britain to China. In the mid-90s, Wong was riding high on the international success of Chungking Express (1994), which was being heralded in the West by the likes of Quentin Tarantino, and praise for its more experimental follow-up Fallen Angels (1995). However, investors and distributors in Asia were wary of Wong following the excessively long, costly productions for his earlier films Days of Being Wild (1990) and Ashes of Time (1994).

As a result, Wong – in typical Hong Kong movie fashion – conceived of a plan to shoot two movies back to back. With the handover looming, the first was to be a more weighty affair about escaping Hong Kong. This would eventually be constructed as Happy Together (1997), shot and set predominantly in Buenos Aires.

The other half of this couple, which would eventually morph into In the Mood for Love, was meant to be a breezier thing in the style of Chungking Express. Intended to be about reconnecting with the mainland, its working title was Summer in Beijing and Tony Leung Chiu-wai and Maggie Cheung were lined up to star. However, the project was abandoned when China’s Film Bureau informed Wong he could not shoot in the country without the government first seeing and approving his script.

Although Wong’s cost-saving plans failed, he did not give up on the Summer in Beijing concept entirely (nor did he give up on the idea of shooting films simultaneously, as work on 2046, in very different form to the final product, began at the same time as In the Mood for Love). By now the director envisaged a film comprised of three short stories – one about a chef, one about the owner of a delicatessen and one about a writer. The link between the tales was to be food, with Beijing the name of a restaurant in Macau that would be used as a setting.


Tony Leung, Maggie Cheung and director Wong Kar-wai at the premiere of In The Mood for Love at Cannes in May 2000. Photo: AFP/Jack Guez

Wong would later reveal: “When we started the project, we called it A Story about Food, and it had three stories. [That part] we see in In the Mood for Love is actually only 30 minutes. It only takes place in the restaurants, in the noodle shop, in the staircase after they buy noodles pretending to have an affair. After I started this part, the main reason for me to make [In the Mood for Love] is I like this story, so I forgot about the other two stories which weren’t made.”

The story that survived was the one about the writer. For this, Wong was inspired by author Liu Yi-chang, whose words appear on screen and bookend In the Mood for Love. In particular, Wong felt a fondness for Liu’s Duidao, a short story about two singletons whose days overlap without the pair ever formally meeting and connecting.

Just as Wong seemed ready to get started on his new film the Asian financial crisis struck in July 1997, severely restricting funding. As Wong’s original investors withdrew, production ground to a halt while he was forced to find new backers.

Belatedly, the show got back on the road in 1999. However, Wong had a muddled imagining of what his film should be. Originally, it was titled simply The Mood for Love and the early scenes he shot were blithe and still based on food. One involved Leung and Cheung stir-frying ingredients in their hotel room 2046 while another was about the pair smuggling in a live chicken.


Maggie Cheung in a scene from In the Mood for Love. Photo: Jet Tone Films

Wong believed In the Mood for Love would be a quick shoot compared to the larger scale 2046, which was now about to get under way too and was initially intended to be based on certain Western operas. The first scenes, shot in Hong Kong, proceeded smoothly enough but things changed when Wong and his crew travelled to Bangkok to scout locations for 2046.

In the Thai capital Wong was amazed to discovered sites that recalled the Hong Kong of his 1960s childhood – the kind long demolished in Hong Kong itself. Wong was inspired, and it was here that In the Mood for Love took on its recognisable form, the tone growing more pensive and lugubrious. The director called his lead actors to Bangkok and, thoughts of 2046 pushed aside, a raft of new material was shot.

The film’s final scenes at Angkor Wat were equally serendipitous. Wong was looking for a Thai temple to film but when he was informed that he could shoot at the temple complex in Cambodia fairly easily, he jumped at the chance and hastily researched reasons that would justify Leung’s character visiting the country.

Wong has said he filmed more than 30 times the length of In the Mood for Love’s final cut. He worked on the film in post-production right until the last minute, barely making the deadline for the Cannes premiere – a process that left him and his production company “physically and financially exhausted”.

Whatever the subdued reactions upon its debut, appreciation for In the Mood for Love has only grown over time. This year Cannes planned a special screening of a 4K restoration of the film in celebration of its 20th anniversary. Evidently, fans are still very much in love with Wong’s greatest work.

In the Mood for Love (2000) ORIGINAL TRAILER [HD]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWVDZ98AFhI&feature=emb_logo
Back to top
View user's profile
Safran



Joined: 22 Mar 2006
Posts: 2528
Location: Austria

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Yitian flower

Many thanks for your excellent summary of pics and articles/ warm words of appreciation !

ITMFL ....and Tony FOR EVER ! love

P.S.
Although we posted at different places, a typical case of mental telepathy ! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mental telepathy indeed Laughing

For ITMFL, these numbers can be made in good use:
520
and
5201314
I guess a Chinese will know meanings of these numbers. Can you hazard a guess Wink Laughing ?


Last edited by yitian on Thu May 21, 2020 7:17 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile
solitude87



Joined: 31 Jan 2008
Posts: 44
Location: NYC

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow time flies. Can't believe it's already 20 years. Big congrats!
_________________
-Eve
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today is 521, here comes our best actor love . Congrats [again] king Applause flower !
(Pix were originally posted on Weibo by various fans)










Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On May 21st, WKW posted this following video on Weibo. Very Happy
He wrote:
【百年特寫】由1902年的《月球旅行記》(A Trip to the Moon) 剪到 2019年奧斯卡最佳電影《寄生蟲》(Parasite),經典電影特寫鏡頭精彩混剪!
「由導演、演員、與燈光完美結合的特寫鏡頭 (Close-up),成就了電影攝影的高度;通過鏡頭中演員的凝視,是觀眾與另一個FACES。」- Ingmar Bergman #英瑪褒曼

Translate:
[Faces Of Cinema] From the "A Trip to the Moon" in 1902 to the best Oscar movie "Parasite" in 2019, this is a wonderful montage of close-ups from classic movies!
“The close-up, the correctly illuminated, directed and acted close-up of an actor is and remains the height of cinematography…… That incredibly strange and mysterious contact you can suddenly experience with another soul through an actor’s gaze.” - Ingmar Bergman
Weibo video link:
https://www.weibo.com/tv/v/J2Yiiytsw?fid=1034:4507083840880668

In case some people don't have Weibo, I found Ignacio Montalvo's originally posted video on Vimeo (link below) Very Happy
https://vimeo.com/403105954
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2020 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is one of those faces




Why am I fixated on those eyelashes Laughing ?
Back to top
View user's profile
ham



Joined: 22 Oct 2004
Posts: 1251
Location: Thailand

PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2020 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In The Mood for Love { Figure}









Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 7:38 pm    Post subject: NYFF 2020 Reply with quote

NYFF 2020 Announces Revivals Lineup, Including ‘In the Mood for Love’ and ‘Smooth Talk’ — Exclusive
The "reshaped" section boasts films from Wong Kar Wai, Joyce Chopra, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Marie-Claude Treilhou, William Klein, Jia Zhangke, and more.
Kate Erbland
Aug 18, 2020 12:30 pm
https://www.indiewire.com/2020/08/nyff-2020-revivals-lineup-1234580815/


“In the Mood for Love” Block 2 Pictures/Photofest

The New York Film Festival is rolling out a “reshaped” version of its Revivals section for this year’s edition of the festival, with a rich assortment of repertory cinema that runs the gamut from beloved classics to rarities seeking new life. The lineup includes a Tony Leung double bill, thanks to Hou Hsiao-hsien’s “Flowers of Shanghai” and Wong Kar Wai’s “In the Mood for Love,” while Joyce Chopra’s 1986 Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner, “Smooth Talk,” shows off a breakout performance by a young Laura Dern.

Other highlights include Jia Zhangke’s rarely screened “Xiao Wu,” Mohammad Reza Aslani’s rediscovered “The Chess Game of the Wind,” and Béla Tarr’s black-and-white noir, “Damnation.” Opening night filmmaker Steve McQueen also had a hand in the selection: he’s opted to screen Jean Vigo’s “Zero for Conduct,” which he says inspired his latest project, a five-film anthology series, the first of which will open the festival.

“We are thrilled with our selections for Revivals, a section reshaped for the 2020 edition of NYFF to showcase the relevance, the vitality, and the beauty of yesterday’s cinema,” said Florence Almozini, FLC Senior Programmer at Large, in an official statement. “The program covers the ’70s to the ’90s, from Europe to Asia to the U.S., and features seminal works by Wong Kar Wai, Joyce Chopra, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Marie-Claude Treilhou, William Klein, Jia Zhangke, and more, in outstanding restorations. Together, these films reveal an enduring influence on our collective sense of cinema, culturally and politically, for filmmakers as well as audience members.”

As indicated by festival brass earlier this summer, this year’s NYFF is going to operate differently than it has in previous incarnations. The event will combine a brand-new virtual presence with carefully designed outdoor screenings, including two drive-ins. To that end, “limited rentals” for Revivals selections “Meeting the Man: James Baldwin in Paris” and “Zero for Conduct” will be available for free to NYFF audiences. Final screening plans for the rest of the slate have not yet been announced, but will roll out in the coming weeks.

As IndieWire reported earlier this month, the 58th edition of the festival will open with Steve McQueen’s “Lovers Rock,” with the festival also playing home to two other features that comprise McQueen’s ambitious new “Small Axe” series in its main slate. Chloe Zhao’s “Nomadland” will screen as the festival’s centerpiece. Last week, the festival also announced that it will close out its festivities with Azazel Jacobs’ “French Exit,” which will make its world premiere as the closing night selection of the upcoming festival.

Its robust Main Slate was also announced, including new films from Garrett Bradley, Heidi Ewing, Philippe Garrel, Hong Sangsoo, Jia Zhangke, Christian Petzold, Sam Pollard, and Frederick Wiseman.

The Revivals section is programmed by Florence Almozini and Dan Sullivan with program advising by Gina Telaroli. Check out this year’s Revivals lineup below, with all descriptions care of NYFF.

“The Chess Game of the Wind”
Mohammad Reza Aslani, Iran, 1976, 93m
Farsi with English subtitles
An unheralded landmark of Iranian cinema, Mohammad Reza Aslani’s debut feature is set during the rule of the Qajar dynasty and chronicles the fallout when a noble family’s matriarch passes away, kindling tensions new and old among her heirs. Screened publicly just once and long thought lost after the 1979 Revolution, “The Chess Game of the Wind” evokes the work of Luchino Visconti in its sumptuous, refined, and poetic rendering of aristocratic decadence, the passage of time, the ties that bind, and the desires that set us against one another. Featuring a remarkable score by the trailblazing female film composer Sheyda Gharachedaghi and masterfully lensed by Houshang Baharlou with a candle-lit grandeur reminiscent of Kubrick’s “Barry Lyndon,” “The Chess Game of the Wind” ranks among the great recent (re)discoveries of world cinema. Restored by Cineteca di Bologna at L’Immagine Ritrovata and The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project. Funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

“Damnation”
Béla Tarr, Hungary, 1986, 116m
Hungarian with English subtitles
A key turning point in Béla Tarr’s career, the first of the director’s six collaborations with novelist László Krasznahorkai signaled a visible shift away from the verité realism of his early features and toward the highly stylized, black-and-white otherworldliness that would become his signature. The story is a kind of desiccated film noir, focusing on the efforts of a dour loner, Karrer (Miklós Székely B.), to steal back his estranged lover—a lounge singer (Vali Kerekes) in a funereal bar named Titanik—from her debt-addled husband. Karrer lures the husband into a smuggling scheme that will force him to leave town, but these well-laid plans soon go awry, and the characters play out their doomed destiny through enveloping layers of rain, shadow, and despair. An Arbelos Films release. New 4K restoration by the Hungarian National Film Institute – Film Archive.

“Flowers of Shanghai”
Hou Hsiao-hsien, Taiwan, 1998, 113m
Cantonese and Shanghainese with English subtitles
An NYFF regular from relatively early in his career, Hou Hsiao-hsien made his seventh festival appearance with this ravishingly beautiful chamber drama that follows the intertwined fortunes and intrigues of four “flower girls” serving in the opulent brothels of fin-de-siècle 19th-century Shanghai. The great Tony Leung stars as the melancholy Master Wang, torn between his affections for the jealous, demanding Crimson (Michiko Hada) and the more eager-to-please Jasmin (Vicky Wei), and gradually realizing that he is looking for love in all the wrong places. Hou’s first film set outside his native Taiwan, “Flowers of Shanghai” is a transfixing masterwork and an achingly, intoxicatingly sensuous landmark of ’90s world cinema. A Janus Films release. Restored in 4K in 2019 from the 35mm original negative by Shochiku in collaboration with the Shanghai International Film Festival at the L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory. With funding provided by Jaeger-LeCoultre.


“The Hourglass Sanatorium”
Wojciech Has, Poland, 1973, 124m
Polish with English subtitles
The collective trauma of the Holocaust looms over this adaptation of Jewish author Bruno Schulz’s visionary and poetic reflection on the nature of time and death, which won the Jury Award at Cannes. Józef (Jan Nowicki) finds himself aboard a train en route to visit his father in the hospital; he arrives to find the hospital in a state that’s a bit less than… orderly. From there, past and present, reality and fantasy, collapse into each other, unleashing a surreal phantasmagoria that is by turns psychedelic, paranoiac, elegiac, funny, and everywhere haunted by the specter of death: both Józef’s prophesied death and the death of a Europe that existed before the rise of Hitler, the horrors of the Holocaust, and the carnage of World War II. New 4K restoration from the original camera negative, produced by Fixafilm (Łukasz Cerenka, Andrzej Łucjanek), supervised by Łukasz Ceranka, and curated by Daniel Bird.

“In the Mood for Love”
Wong Kar Wai, Hong Kong, 2000, 98m
Cantonese and Shanghainese with English subtitles
Wong Kar Wai’s swoon-inducing instant classic made Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung the star-crossed dream team of the early 2000s art house. They play next-door neighbors who, upon discovering that their spouses are carrying on an affair, start a platonic romance of their own amid the alleyways and noodle shops of 1960s Hong Kong. The breathless, will-they-won’t-they tension is pushed to intoxicating heights by the luscious mise en scène: Christopher Doyle’s caressing cinematography; the sensuous use of slo-mo; the red- and green-saturated and patterned print-galore period art direction (that wallpaper!); and the haunting, endlessly repeating strains of Nat King Cole. “Quizás, quizás, quizás…” A Janus Films release. This 4K digital restoration was undertaken from the 35mm original camera negative by the Criterion Collection, in collaboration with Jet Tone Films, L’Immagine Ritrovata, One Cool, and Robert Mackenzie Sound. Supervised and approved by Wong Kar Wai.


“Meeting the Man: James Baldwin in Paris”
Terence Dixon, U.K./France, 1971, 27m
This rare film document of one of the towering figures of 20th-century American literature—photographed by Jack Hazan (“Rude Boy,” “A Bigger Splash”)—captures the iconic writer in several symbolic locations, including the Place de la Bastille. As Hazan recounts: “Things don’t go to plan for him and the film crew when a couple of young Black Vietnam draft dodgers impose themselves on the American. Baldwin wrestles with being a role model to the Black youths, denouncing Western colonialism and crimes against African Americans while at the same time demonstrating his mastery and understanding of the culture he supposedly despises.” Restored from a 2K scan of the 16mm original color negative A&B rolls and the 16mm optical negative. Scanning services by UPP, Prague. Picture and audio restoration, grading, and mastering by Mark Rance, Watchmaker Films, London. The film is presented in 1.37:1.

“Muhammad Ali, the Greatest”
William Klein, France, 1974, 123m
English and French with English subtitles
A masterful study of one of the greatest boxers of all time and a key cultural and political figure of his era, Klein’s portrait of Muhammad Ali ranks among the most enjoyable, provocative, and candid sports documentaries. Focusing on the lead-ups to and aftermaths of three of Ali’s defining bouts—the two fights with Sonny Liston in 1964 and ’65, and the “Rumble in the Jungle” with George Foreman in ’74—Klein vividly captures Ali in his element as well as the sociopolitical climate surrounding the champ. Featuring some of the most enthralling footage of Ali boasting ever committed to celluloid, “Muhammad Ali, the Greatest” is an astonishing work that renders its beyond-charismatic subject in all his prowess (verbal and physical), complexity, and majesty. Presented by Films Paris New York and ARTE. First digital 2K restoration from the original 16mm negative scanned in 4K carried out with the support of the CNC. Image works were carried out by ECLAIR Classics and by L.E.DIAPASON for the sound.

“Simone Barbes or Virtue” / “Simone Barbès ou la vertu”
Marie-Claude Treilhou, France, 1980, 77m
French with English subtitles
A criminally overlooked work from the post-post-New Wave era of French cinema, Marie-Claude Treilhou’s feature debut assumes the form of a triptych, following leather-clad porno theater usher Simone (Ingrid Bourgoin) as she banters with her coworker (Martine Simonet) while watching the eccentric strangers puttering in and out of the cinema’s lobby; then clocks out and heads off to meet her girlfriend, a waitress at a lesbian club; and later, has an encounter with a lonely man on the prowl (Cahiers du cinéma critic Michel Delahaye). But the minimalist plot of “Simone Barbes” almost seems besides the point: Treilhou’s film is saturated with style and atmosphere, the chargedness of each throwaway gesture, idle remark, or seemingly empty moment yielding a character study unlike any other. 4K scan and restoration by Cosmodigital for La Traverse with the support of the CNC.

“Smooth Talk”
Joyce Chopra, U.S., 1985, 92m
In her first lead role, 18-year-old Laura Dern gave one of her most stirring, layered performances in an adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates’s 1966 short story “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” She stars as Connie Wyatt, a teenager who spends her summer days moping around the house and exploring her sexuality in the Northern California suburbs. But the thrills and innocence of youth are forever shaded by the predatory behavior of an older man named Arnold Friend (Treat Williams) whom she encounters at a drive-in. “Smooth Talk” won the Sundance Film Festival’s Grand Jury Prize in 1986 and remains a carefully observed, shockingly powerful story of manipulation and deviance. A Janus Films release. New 4K restoration undertaken by the Criterion Collection.

“Xiao Wu”
Jia Zhangke, China, 1997, 112m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Among the most essential filmmakers of the past several decades, Jia Zhangke launched his career with this, his 1997 debut (featured in New Directors/New Films in 1999) about a pickpocket struggling to keep up with the current of China’s transformation into an economic powerhouse. Abandoned by his friends and associates and stymied by the terrain shifting beneath him, the titular and somewhat nihilistic thief stumbles upon a chance at love—or at least a human connection—and finds himself confronted with the question: is this any way to live? Even in this early work, Jia’s unsurpassed attentiveness to the texture of quotidian life amid a society in flux is powerfully in evidence, presaging his current status as cinema’s great portraitist of the latter-day Chinese behemoth. Restored by The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project and Cineteca di Bologna at L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory in collaboration with Jia Zhangke and in association with MK2. Restoration funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

Steve McQueen Selects:

“Zero for Conduct” / “Zéro de conduite”
Jean Vigo, France, 1933, 49m
French with English subtitles
Among the greatest artworks about the anarchic energies of youth, Jean Vigo’s autobiographical mid-length film endures as a singular masterpiece whose influence and reputation have only grown in the decades since his untimely death at age 29 a year later after the film’s release. Set in an all-boys boarding school, the film follows the students as they set about turning the institution’s uptight rules on their head. A delirious and visually astonishing achievement and an acknowledged inspiration for Francois Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows” and Lindsay Anderson’s “if…” (among countless other films), “Zero for Conduct” is at once a sweet ode to childhood and a dreamlike exaltation of youthful chaos. Restored in 4K by Gaumont in association with The Film Foundation and La Cinémathèque française with the support of the Centre National de la Cinématographie. Restoration performed at L’Immagine Ritrovata in Bologna and Paris.

The festival will run September 17 through October 11. Further additions to the slate, including Currents, Spotlight, and Talks, will be announced in the coming weeks.
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 7:39 pm    Post subject: NYFF 2020 Reply with quote

NYFF 2020 Announces Revivals Lineup, Including ‘In the Mood for Love’ and ‘Smooth Talk’ — Exclusive
The "reshaped" section boasts films from Wong Kar Wai, Joyce Chopra, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Marie-Claude Treilhou, William Klein, Jia Zhangke, and more.
Kate Erbland
Aug 18, 2020 12:30 pm
https://www.indiewire.com/2020/08/nyff-2020-revivals-lineup-1234580815/


“In the Mood for Love” Block 2 Pictures/Photofest

The New York Film Festival is rolling out a “reshaped” version of its Revivals section for this year’s edition of the festival, with a rich assortment of repertory cinema that runs the gamut from beloved classics to rarities seeking new life. The lineup includes a Tony Leung double bill, thanks to Hou Hsiao-hsien’s “Flowers of Shanghai” and Wong Kar Wai’s “In the Mood for Love,” while Joyce Chopra’s 1986 Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner, “Smooth Talk,” shows off a breakout performance by a young Laura Dern.

Other highlights include Jia Zhangke’s rarely screened “Xiao Wu,” Mohammad Reza Aslani’s rediscovered “The Chess Game of the Wind,” and Béla Tarr’s black-and-white noir, “Damnation.” Opening night filmmaker Steve McQueen also had a hand in the selection: he’s opted to screen Jean Vigo’s “Zero for Conduct,” which he says inspired his latest project, a five-film anthology series, the first of which will open the festival.

“We are thrilled with our selections for Revivals, a section reshaped for the 2020 edition of NYFF to showcase the relevance, the vitality, and the beauty of yesterday’s cinema,” said Florence Almozini, FLC Senior Programmer at Large, in an official statement. “The program covers the ’70s to the ’90s, from Europe to Asia to the U.S., and features seminal works by Wong Kar Wai, Joyce Chopra, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Marie-Claude Treilhou, William Klein, Jia Zhangke, and more, in outstanding restorations. Together, these films reveal an enduring influence on our collective sense of cinema, culturally and politically, for filmmakers as well as audience members.”

As indicated by festival brass earlier this summer, this year’s NYFF is going to operate differently than it has in previous incarnations. The event will combine a brand-new virtual presence with carefully designed outdoor screenings, including two drive-ins. To that end, “limited rentals” for Revivals selections “Meeting the Man: James Baldwin in Paris” and “Zero for Conduct” will be available for free to NYFF audiences. Final screening plans for the rest of the slate have not yet been announced, but will roll out in the coming weeks.

As IndieWire reported earlier this month, the 58th edition of the festival will open with Steve McQueen’s “Lovers Rock,” with the festival also playing home to two other features that comprise McQueen’s ambitious new “Small Axe” series in its main slate. Chloe Zhao’s “Nomadland” will screen as the festival’s centerpiece. Last week, the festival also announced that it will close out its festivities with Azazel Jacobs’ “French Exit,” which will make its world premiere as the closing night selection of the upcoming festival.

Its robust Main Slate was also announced, including new films from Garrett Bradley, Heidi Ewing, Philippe Garrel, Hong Sangsoo, Jia Zhangke, Christian Petzold, Sam Pollard, and Frederick Wiseman.

The Revivals section is programmed by Florence Almozini and Dan Sullivan with program advising by Gina Telaroli. Check out this year’s Revivals lineup below, with all descriptions care of NYFF.

“The Chess Game of the Wind”
Mohammad Reza Aslani, Iran, 1976, 93m
Farsi with English subtitles
An unheralded landmark of Iranian cinema, Mohammad Reza Aslani’s debut feature is set during the rule of the Qajar dynasty and chronicles the fallout when a noble family’s matriarch passes away, kindling tensions new and old among her heirs. Screened publicly just once and long thought lost after the 1979 Revolution, “The Chess Game of the Wind” evokes the work of Luchino Visconti in its sumptuous, refined, and poetic rendering of aristocratic decadence, the passage of time, the ties that bind, and the desires that set us against one another. Featuring a remarkable score by the trailblazing female film composer Sheyda Gharachedaghi and masterfully lensed by Houshang Baharlou with a candle-lit grandeur reminiscent of Kubrick’s “Barry Lyndon,” “The Chess Game of the Wind” ranks among the great recent (re)discoveries of world cinema. Restored by Cineteca di Bologna at L’Immagine Ritrovata and The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project. Funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

“Damnation”
Béla Tarr, Hungary, 1986, 116m
Hungarian with English subtitles
A key turning point in Béla Tarr’s career, the first of the director’s six collaborations with novelist László Krasznahorkai signaled a visible shift away from the verité realism of his early features and toward the highly stylized, black-and-white otherworldliness that would become his signature. The story is a kind of desiccated film noir, focusing on the efforts of a dour loner, Karrer (Miklós Székely B.), to steal back his estranged lover—a lounge singer (Vali Kerekes) in a funereal bar named Titanik—from her debt-addled husband. Karrer lures the husband into a smuggling scheme that will force him to leave town, but these well-laid plans soon go awry, and the characters play out their doomed destiny through enveloping layers of rain, shadow, and despair. An Arbelos Films release. New 4K restoration by the Hungarian National Film Institute – Film Archive.

“Flowers of Shanghai”
Hou Hsiao-hsien, Taiwan, 1998, 113m
Cantonese and Shanghainese with English subtitles
An NYFF regular from relatively early in his career, Hou Hsiao-hsien made his seventh festival appearance with this ravishingly beautiful chamber drama that follows the intertwined fortunes and intrigues of four “flower girls” serving in the opulent brothels of fin-de-siècle 19th-century Shanghai. The great Tony Leung stars as the melancholy Master Wang, torn between his affections for the jealous, demanding Crimson (Michiko Hada) and the more eager-to-please Jasmin (Vicky Wei), and gradually realizing that he is looking for love in all the wrong places. Hou’s first film set outside his native Taiwan, “Flowers of Shanghai” is a transfixing masterwork and an achingly, intoxicatingly sensuous landmark of ’90s world cinema. A Janus Films release. Restored in 4K in 2019 from the 35mm original negative by Shochiku in collaboration with the Shanghai International Film Festival at the L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory. With funding provided by Jaeger-LeCoultre.


“The Hourglass Sanatorium”
Wojciech Has, Poland, 1973, 124m
Polish with English subtitles
The collective trauma of the Holocaust looms over this adaptation of Jewish author Bruno Schulz’s visionary and poetic reflection on the nature of time and death, which won the Jury Award at Cannes. Józef (Jan Nowicki) finds himself aboard a train en route to visit his father in the hospital; he arrives to find the hospital in a state that’s a bit less than… orderly. From there, past and present, reality and fantasy, collapse into each other, unleashing a surreal phantasmagoria that is by turns psychedelic, paranoiac, elegiac, funny, and everywhere haunted by the specter of death: both Józef’s prophesied death and the death of a Europe that existed before the rise of Hitler, the horrors of the Holocaust, and the carnage of World War II. New 4K restoration from the original camera negative, produced by Fixafilm (Łukasz Cerenka, Andrzej Łucjanek), supervised by Łukasz Ceranka, and curated by Daniel Bird.

“In the Mood for Love”
Wong Kar Wai, Hong Kong, 2000, 98m
Cantonese and Shanghainese with English subtitles
Wong Kar Wai’s swoon-inducing instant classic made Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung the star-crossed dream team of the early 2000s art house. They play next-door neighbors who, upon discovering that their spouses are carrying on an affair, start a platonic romance of their own amid the alleyways and noodle shops of 1960s Hong Kong. The breathless, will-they-won’t-they tension is pushed to intoxicating heights by the luscious mise en scène: Christopher Doyle’s caressing cinematography; the sensuous use of slo-mo; the red- and green-saturated and patterned print-galore period art direction (that wallpaper!); and the haunting, endlessly repeating strains of Nat King Cole. “Quizás, quizás, quizás…” A Janus Films release. This 4K digital restoration was undertaken from the 35mm original camera negative by the Criterion Collection, in collaboration with Jet Tone Films, L’Immagine Ritrovata, One Cool, and Robert Mackenzie Sound. Supervised and approved by Wong Kar Wai.


“Meeting the Man: James Baldwin in Paris”
Terence Dixon, U.K./France, 1971, 27m
This rare film document of one of the towering figures of 20th-century American literature—photographed by Jack Hazan (“Rude Boy,” “A Bigger Splash”)—captures the iconic writer in several symbolic locations, including the Place de la Bastille. As Hazan recounts: “Things don’t go to plan for him and the film crew when a couple of young Black Vietnam draft dodgers impose themselves on the American. Baldwin wrestles with being a role model to the Black youths, denouncing Western colonialism and crimes against African Americans while at the same time demonstrating his mastery and understanding of the culture he supposedly despises.” Restored from a 2K scan of the 16mm original color negative A&B rolls and the 16mm optical negative. Scanning services by UPP, Prague. Picture and audio restoration, grading, and mastering by Mark Rance, Watchmaker Films, London. The film is presented in 1.37:1.

“Muhammad Ali, the Greatest”
William Klein, France, 1974, 123m
English and French with English subtitles
A masterful study of one of the greatest boxers of all time and a key cultural and political figure of his era, Klein’s portrait of Muhammad Ali ranks among the most enjoyable, provocative, and candid sports documentaries. Focusing on the lead-ups to and aftermaths of three of Ali’s defining bouts—the two fights with Sonny Liston in 1964 and ’65, and the “Rumble in the Jungle” with George Foreman in ’74—Klein vividly captures Ali in his element as well as the sociopolitical climate surrounding the champ. Featuring some of the most enthralling footage of Ali boasting ever committed to celluloid, “Muhammad Ali, the Greatest” is an astonishing work that renders its beyond-charismatic subject in all his prowess (verbal and physical), complexity, and majesty. Presented by Films Paris New York and ARTE. First digital 2K restoration from the original 16mm negative scanned in 4K carried out with the support of the CNC. Image works were carried out by ECLAIR Classics and by L.E.DIAPASON for the sound.

“Simone Barbes or Virtue” / “Simone Barbès ou la vertu”
Marie-Claude Treilhou, France, 1980, 77m
French with English subtitles
A criminally overlooked work from the post-post-New Wave era of French cinema, Marie-Claude Treilhou’s feature debut assumes the form of a triptych, following leather-clad porno theater usher Simone (Ingrid Bourgoin) as she banters with her coworker (Martine Simonet) while watching the eccentric strangers puttering in and out of the cinema’s lobby; then clocks out and heads off to meet her girlfriend, a waitress at a lesbian club; and later, has an encounter with a lonely man on the prowl (Cahiers du cinéma critic Michel Delahaye). But the minimalist plot of “Simone Barbes” almost seems besides the point: Treilhou’s film is saturated with style and atmosphere, the chargedness of each throwaway gesture, idle remark, or seemingly empty moment yielding a character study unlike any other. 4K scan and restoration by Cosmodigital for La Traverse with the support of the CNC.

“Smooth Talk”
Joyce Chopra, U.S., 1985, 92m
In her first lead role, 18-year-old Laura Dern gave one of her most stirring, layered performances in an adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates’s 1966 short story “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” She stars as Connie Wyatt, a teenager who spends her summer days moping around the house and exploring her sexuality in the Northern California suburbs. But the thrills and innocence of youth are forever shaded by the predatory behavior of an older man named Arnold Friend (Treat Williams) whom she encounters at a drive-in. “Smooth Talk” won the Sundance Film Festival’s Grand Jury Prize in 1986 and remains a carefully observed, shockingly powerful story of manipulation and deviance. A Janus Films release. New 4K restoration undertaken by the Criterion Collection.

“Xiao Wu”
Jia Zhangke, China, 1997, 112m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Among the most essential filmmakers of the past several decades, Jia Zhangke launched his career with this, his 1997 debut (featured in New Directors/New Films in 1999) about a pickpocket struggling to keep up with the current of China’s transformation into an economic powerhouse. Abandoned by his friends and associates and stymied by the terrain shifting beneath him, the titular and somewhat nihilistic thief stumbles upon a chance at love—or at least a human connection—and finds himself confronted with the question: is this any way to live? Even in this early work, Jia’s unsurpassed attentiveness to the texture of quotidian life amid a society in flux is powerfully in evidence, presaging his current status as cinema’s great portraitist of the latter-day Chinese behemoth. Restored by The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project and Cineteca di Bologna at L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory in collaboration with Jia Zhangke and in association with MK2. Restoration funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

Steve McQueen Selects:

“Zero for Conduct” / “Zéro de conduite”
Jean Vigo, France, 1933, 49m
French with English subtitles
Among the greatest artworks about the anarchic energies of youth, Jean Vigo’s autobiographical mid-length film endures as a singular masterpiece whose influence and reputation have only grown in the decades since his untimely death at age 29 a year later after the film’s release. Set in an all-boys boarding school, the film follows the students as they set about turning the institution’s uptight rules on their head. A delirious and visually astonishing achievement and an acknowledged inspiration for Francois Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows” and Lindsay Anderson’s “if…” (among countless other films), “Zero for Conduct” is at once a sweet ode to childhood and a dreamlike exaltation of youthful chaos. Restored in 4K by Gaumont in association with The Film Foundation and La Cinémathèque française with the support of the Centre National de la Cinématographie. Restoration performed at L’Immagine Ritrovata in Bologna and Paris.

The festival will run September 17 through October 11. Further additions to the slate, including Currents, Spotlight, and Talks, will be announced in the coming weeks.
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The actual pages from the New York Film Festival 58, September 17th 2020 - October 11th 2020
https://www.filmlinc.org/nyff2020/

Two films starring "The great Tony Leung" love





Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Read more about 4K restorations of WKW's films from the official website:
https://www.block2distribution.com/collections/wong-kar-wai-1

At the end of my film In The Mood For Love, there was a caption:
He remembers those vanished years.
As though looking through a dusty window pane,
the past is something he could see, but not touch.
And everything he sees is blurred and indistinct.
It was my exact feeling when I watched the film again in 2015.
In collaboration with the Criterion Collection and with the meticulous work of L'Immagine Ritrovata, we spent five years on the restoration of not only In the Mood For Love, but also the rest of this collection.
Now, the window is no longer dusty.
— WKW

IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE 4K | Official Trailer (English)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJj9-t2A-_o
Back to top
View user's profile
yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 2004
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The YouTube introduction reads:
To mark the 20th anniversary of IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE, Block 2 Distribution has released a commemorative trailer of the Wong Kar Wai classic.
In collaboration with the Criterion Collection, Wong Kar Wai and L’Immagine Ritrovata spent five years on the 4K restoration of not only IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE, but also of CHUNGKING EXPRESS, FALLEN ANGELS, HAPPY TOGETHER and 2046. Sony Pictures Classics collaborated in the restoration of 2046.

Do I expect to see a WKW 4K set soon to be available from Criterion? love Dancing love Dancing love
Pray Pray Pray Pray Pray Pray
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.tonyleung.info Forum Index -> Tony Leung Movies All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group