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Lumiere Film Festival 2017
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yitian



Joined: 06 Jul 2011
Posts: 1636
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:30 pm    Post subject: Lumiere Film Festival 2017 Reply with quote

Lumière Film Festival 2017
http://www.festival-lumiere.org/en/

Wong Kar-wai will receive this year’s Lumière Award

Wong Kar-wai
Lumière Award 2017
王家衛



Chinese filmmaker Wong Kar-wai will receive this year’s Lumière Award, following in the footsteps of Martin Scorsese and Catherine Deneuve. The distinction will be bestowed upon him during the 9th edition of the Lumière festival, to be held in Lyon and its metropolis from Saturday the 14th to Sunday the 22nd of October 2017.
Attributed by the Institut Lumière, the Lumière Award will be presented to Wong Kar-wai for his unclassifiable films, each with countless flares of beauty, for the trace he is leaving upon cinema history, for all that is glorious and lingering in his work, for the neon lights of Hong Kong and the snows of Manchuria, and because, after all, dark glasses are undeniably classy.
«It is a great honor for me to be the recipient of this award and it gives me great pride to join those distinguished before me,» stated Wong Kar-wai. «To belong, in a way, to this Institut, inspired by the founders of cinema, makes me feel extremely humble. I am already looking forward to being in Lyon in October.»
Wong Kar-wai was born in Shanghai in 1958. At age 5, he emigrated to Hong Kong with his mother. In her company, Wong Kar-wai spent many afternoons at the movie theater, taking in sometimes 2 or 3 Hollywood classics a day, as well as westerns, which his mother was particularly fond of. While studying graphic arts at Hong Kong Polytechnic, Wong Kar-wai discovered European cinema, the New Wave, Bertolucci, Bresson and Godard…
During his studies, he joined the production training course of the Shaw Brothers’ TVB channel, becoming a production assistant on popular series and soap operas. Leaving television for the cinema, he entered Cinema City as a screenwriter and, in seven years, penned a dozen screenplays, writing a total of some fifty scripts altogether.
In 1988, Wong Kar-wai turned his hand to directing with As Tears Go By, followed by Days of Being Wild (1990), Chungking Express (1994), Ashes of Time (1994) and Fallen Angels (1995). Cult classics today, these films laid the thematic foundations of Wong Kar-wai’s work: the notion of time, wandering, remembrance, the wounds of love. His city, Hong Kong, has also played a role in his films. His cinema is that of a generation, chronicling lost youth and marginal characters. By developing his own narrative codes, he has imposed a cinéma d’auteur on a Hong Kong landscape previously known around the world for its martial arts movies or thrillers.
He achieved solid international recognition in 1997 with Happy Together, winning Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival, and particularly with In the Mood for Love (2000), which garnered tremendous public and critical success. Wong Kar-wai then went on to direct 2046 (2004), My Blueberry Nights (2007) and finally, The Grandmaster (2013), to date, his greatest success in China, to whom the sovereignty of Hong Kong had returned.
In his country, Wong Kar-wai is a mysterious icon, an artisan bringing infinite care to create each scene and setting for his actors - Tony Leung, Maggie Cheung, Andy Lau, Zhang Ziyi, Gong Li, Leslie Cheung and Faye Wong – as well as for Norah Jones, Jude Law, Natalie Portman... Impenetrable behind his dark glasses and plumes of smoke, Wong Kar-wai is a perfectionist, obsessive filmmaker, postponing the end of filming, extending the months of editing, as if to delay the moment when his film will no longer completely belong to him. Speaking of The Grandmaster, he admits, «Actually, I would have liked the experience of this film to never end.»
Melancholic, visual, contemplative and musical, the cinema of Wong Kar-wai has reached beyond the circle of moviegoers and critics, attracting a public drawn to his search for the esthetic and poetic, accompanied by his chief operator Christopher Doyle and artistic director William Chang.
«He is a painter of the city and of the human heart, of our desires, our secrets and frustrations,» wrote Michel Ciment and Hubert Niogret in Positif. “His relationship with Hong Kong and his fascination with women are at the core of his creation. This is where the greatest director of Hong Kong resembles the artists of late romanticism, a Baudelaire or a Gustave Moreau. For them as well, in the heart of exquisite beauty hides an unspeakable suffering.»
In more than 25 years, Wong Kar-wai has directed 10 feature films, many short films, as well as clips for the cinema, television and music. His body of work has been recognized by numerous awards in Asia and all over the globe.
The Lumière Award will be presented to Wong Kar-wai on Friday, October 20th at 7:30pm at the Lyon Convention Center in the presence of the French audience and many special guests from around the world

Video on YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHrNLy0LZHk#action=share
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yitian



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wong Kar-wai
Prix Lumière 2017

http://www.festival-lumiere.org/en/program/wong-kar-wai-prix-lumiere-2017.html

An elegant, chimerical and moving storyteller, Wong Kar-wai is a modern yet timeless virtuoso of style and image. First recognized for Happy Together (Best Director at Cannes), he garnered great public success with In the Mood for Love in 2000. The festival proposes his entire filmography (with theatrical re-releases of his first works with ARP Sélection), a carte blanche list of his favorite Chinese films from the 2000s (including several never released in France), a master class and the Lumière Award ceremony, a celebration of his work. The director will be accompanied by the great cinematographer Christopher Doyle.

Master class
Célestins, Théâtre de Lyon
Friday, October 20 (afternoon)
Lumière Award Ceremony
Amphitheater – Lyon Conference Center
Friday, October 20 (evening)

Ticket sales for the master class and the Lumière Award ceremony will open soon. 


As Tears Go By by Wong Kar-wai (Wang Jiao ka men, 1988, 1h42)
A midlevel gangster falls in love with his cousin, while his hothead younger “brother” lands in all kinds of trouble... An inspired thriller, mixing comedy, parody, and melodrama, starring Andy Lau and Maggie Cheung.
Institut Lumière Wed. 18 at 9:45pm

Days of Being Wild by Wong Kar-wai (Ah fei zing zyun, 1990, 1h34)
A young man with brazen charm seduces a waitress, then a dancer... A haunting and sensual saga, with Hong Kong stars Leslie Cheung, Maggie Cheung and Andy Lau.
Cinéma Opéra Sun. 15 at 7:15pm I Pathé Bellecour Fri. 20 at 2:30pm I Lumière Terreaux Sun. 22 at 2:30pm

Chungking Express by Wong Kar-wai (Chung Hing sam lam, 1994, 1h42)
A pair of stories of two policemen unlucky in love... Completed quickly during a break from shooting Ashes of Time, a funny, touching movie full of movement, a portrait of youths in search of identity.
Comœdia Sun. 15 at 9:30pm I Villeurbanne Tue. 17 at 8:30pm I Cinéma Opéra Wed. 18 at 7:15pm I UGC Confluence Thu. 19 at 9pm I Cinéma Opéra Fri. 20 at 7:30pm

Ashes of Time by Wong Kar-wai (Dung che sai duk, 1994, 1h40)
Feng, raised by his brother, chooses the martial arts, to the detriment of the woman he loves... The “wuxia pian,” or Chinese sword film, according to Wong Kar-wai. With Leslie Cheung and Tony Leung.
Bron Sun. 15 at 2:30pm I Cinéma Opéra Mon. 16 at 5pm I Pathé Bellecour Tue. 17 at 6:45pm I Lumière Bellecour Fri. 20 at 4:30pm

Fallen Angels by Wong Kar-wai (Do lok tin si, 1995, 1h36)
Intertwined destinies: a professional killer, his female partner, a young mute con-artist, and Cherry, who obsesses over her ex-lover... A dazzling tale with melancholy beauty, mysterious and poignant.
Lumière Terreaux Thu. 19 at 7:15pm I Amphithéâtre – Centre de Congrès Fri. 20, evening (time TBA) I Cinéma Opéra Sat. 21 at 6:15pm

Happy Together by Wong Kar-wai (Chun gwong cha sit, 1997, 1h36)
Two boys, Lai and Ho, love each other and leave Hong Kong for Argentina. But Ho soon leaves Lai... Filmed in Argentina shortly before the handover of Hong Kong to China, a universal love story, with the lingering scent of tango.
UGC Confluence Mon. 16 at 8:30pm I Institut Lumière Thu. 19 at 7:45pm I Cinéma Opéra Fri. 20 at 2:30pm I CinéDuchère Sat. 21 at 8:30pm

In the Mood for Love by Wong Kar-wai (Faa yeung nin wa, 2000, 1h38)
Hong Kong, 1962. A man and a woman, neighbors, learn that their respective spouses are having an affair... Pure splendor, a hypnotic and overwhelming dream, with unforgettable music. Starring Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung.
Halle Tony Garnier Sun. 22 (afternoon)

2046 by Wong Kar-wai(2004, 2h08)
Hong Kong,1966. In room 2047 of a hotel where he resides, Chow begins writing his novel that takes place in room 2046, all the while haunted by the memory of the woman he cherished... A labyrinth of love, loneliness, the thirst for life. With Tony Leung, Gong Li and Zhang Ziyi.
Pathé Bellecour Mon. 16 at 8:30pm I Lumière Terreaux Wed. 18 at 9:30pm I Comœdia Sat. 21 at 8pm

My Blueberry Nights by Wong Kar-wai (2007, 1h35)
New York. After a break up, Elizabeth (Norah Jones) embarks on a journey across the United States... Wong Kar-wai in America: a road-movie with a pop sense of melancholy, starring Jude Law, Rachel Weisz, Natalie Portman.
Pathé Bellecour Thu. 19 at 7:15pm I Institut Lumière Sat. 21 at 9am I Lumière Bellecour Sun. 22 at 2:45pm

The Grandmaster by Wong Kar-wai (Yi dai zong shi, 2013, 2h10)
1936, China. Great martial arts master Baosen bids farewell to the representatives of the kung-fu schools. He is looking for a successor... Based on the true story of Ip Man (future mentor to Bruce Lee) and his destiny in an epic work. With Tony Leung.
Pathé Bellecour Tue. 17 at 2:15pm I Francheville Wed. 18 at 8pm I Lumière Fourmi Fri. 20 at 5pm I UGC Ciné Cité Internationale Sat. 21 at 8:30pm

Short Film
Eros - segment La Main by Wong Kar-wai (Eros - segment The Hand, 2004, 46min)
1963. A young tailor is sent to take the measurements of a client, Miss Hua (Gong Li), a sublime courtesan... A sensual evocation of touch, desire and eroticism.
Institut Lumière Wed 18 at 9:45pm following As Tears Go By

Christopher Doyle
Wind by Tiong Guan Saw (2016, 33min)
Christopher Doyle, a master director of photography who has worked with Wong Kar-wai, Gus Van Sant and James Ivory tells his stories in an intimate and captivating interview.
Villa Lumière Thu. 19 at 4:45pm followed by a discussion with Christopher Doyle

Complete List of Films
http://www.festival-lumiere.org/en/program/list-of-films.html
Wong Kar-wai: Lumière Award 2017
As Tears Go By by Wong Kar-wai (Wang Jiao ka men, 1988, 1h42)
Days of Being Wild by Wong Kar-wai (Ah fei zing zyun, 1990, 1h34)
Chungking Express by Wong Kar-wai (Chung Hing sam lam, 1994, 1h42)
Ashes of Time by Wong Kar-wai (Dung che sai duk, 1994, 1h40)
Fallen Angels by Wong Kar-wai (Do lok tin si, 1995, 1h36)
Happy Together by Wong Kar-wai (Chun gwong cha sit, 1997, 1h36)
In the Mood for Love by Wong Kar-wai (Faa yeung nin wa, 2000, 1h38)
2046 by Wong Kar-wai (2004, 2h08)
My Blueberry Nights by Wong Kar-wai (2007, 1h35)
The Grandmaster by Wong Kar-wai (Yi dai zong shi, 2013, 2h10)
Short film
Eros - segment The Hand by Wong Kar-wai (46min)

Christopher Doyle
Wind by Tiong Guan Saw (2016, 33min)

Master class
Master class by Wong Kar-wai

Carte blanche to Wong Kar-wai
Chinese films of the 2000s
Durian Durian by Fruit Chan (Liu lian piao piao, 2000, 1h56)
Infernal Affairs by Andrew Lau and Alan Mak (Mou gaan dou, 2002, 1h41)
PTU by Johnnie To (PTU, 2003, 1h28)
Kung-Fu Hustle by Stephen Chow (Kung fu, 2004, 1h39)
You are the Apple of my Eye by Giddens Ko (Na xie nian, wo men yi qi zhui de nv hai, 2011, 1h49)
Rigor Mortis by Juno Mak (Geung si, 2013, 1h41)
Blind Massage by Lou Ye (Tui na, 2014, 1h54)
Breakup Buddies by Ning Hao (Xin hua lu fang, 2014, 1h56)
The Final Master by Xu Haofeng (Shi Fu, 2015, 1h49)
Last Laugh by Zhang Tao (2017, 1h20)

And many more……
Program in French
http://www.festival-lumiere.org/media/festival-lumiere-2017/programme-lumiere-2017-bd.pdf
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yitian



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the Mood For Love, as the closing film, will have its 4K restoration world premiere at Lumiere on October 22nd 2017.

Pix credit - 刘敏欧洲 on Weibo

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yitian



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Other Goodies

The Lumière Gallery - A gallery dedicated to the cinema in the heart of Lyon
http://www.festival-lumiere.org/en/festival-venues/cinema-photo-gallery-of-the-institut-lumi%C3%A8re.html
Once a year, the cinema photo gallery holds a sports-themed photo exhibit as part of the Sports, Literature and Cinema festival at the Institut Lumière. During the Lumière festival 2017, the gallery will feature the films of Wong Kar-wai.
http://www.festival-lumiere.org/cache/media/institut-lumiere/galerie/wkw-expo-42/r%2C300%2C443%2C1-1c3237.jpg
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE
The films of Wong Kar-wai
Photography exhibition from September 15 to November 12, 2017
LUMIÈRE GALLERY
The Lumière Gallery ticket office of the Lumière festival will be open from September 8 to September 12. The Gallery will be closed on September 13and 14, re-opening with the new exhibition on September 15.
Free entry Wednesday through Sunday from 12pm to 7pm.
Special hours: Open Tuesdays from 12pm to 7pm until the last day of the Lumière festival.
3 rue de l'Arbre Sec, Lyon 1st
69001 Lyon
Metro - Hôtel de Ville

Goodies at the museum gift shop:
http://boutique.institut-lumiere.org/en/


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Safran



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Yitian flower
.....for sharing this VERY GOOD NEWS for WKW fans - all over the world cheers

A well deserved recognition ! CONGRATS to Mr. Cool ! Applause thumbleft
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yitian



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2017 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

English program is now available Very Happy
http://www.festival-lumiere.org/media/festival-lumiere-2017/documents/program-l2017.pdf
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yitian



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’
The director receives the Lumière Festival’s 2017 Lumière Award
By Ed Meza
Variety October 21, 2017 12:24AM PT

http://variety.com/2017/film/festivals/wong-kar-wai-lumiere-award-early-influences-bruce-lee-hong-kong-handover-grandmaster-1202595681/

LYON The Lumière Festival honored Wong Kar-wai with the Lumière Award on Friday following a wide-ranging discussion between the Chinese filmmaker and the festival director Thierry Frémaux about his life and career.

Asked about his early influences during the master class, held in front of a packed house at the majestic Théâtre des Célestins ahead of the evening’s award ceremony, Wong said he moved with his family from Shanghai to Hong Kong as a child in 1962 before the onset of the Cultural Revolution. Since the family had no friends or relatives in Hong Kong and did not speak Cantonese, Wong regularly went to the movies with his mother.

“It’s all because of my mother. My mother is a big film buff – she enjoyed watching movies. The fact that we didn’t have any friends and relatives in this new city, the only thing she liked to do was take me to the cinema. We spent almost every day watching films – French films, Hollywood films, Italian films, films from Taiwan and local productions. This was sort of my film school, my education.”

One time his father took him to see a “romantic love story,” only to get scolded afterwards by his wife and others for bringing a child to a Federico Fellini movie.

In those days, kids didn’t have many choices, Wong explained. “Radio and film were my basic hobbies.” After years of watching films day after day, Wong realized film was what he wanted to do “and at a certain point you feel, well, maybe I can do it better.”

In addition to importing a lot of films, Hong Kong was in the 1960s also the center of entertainment for all the Chinese regions, including Mandarin-language films for the lucrative export market and Cantonese opera films for the local audience, with kung fu movies coming later.

“Hong Kong was good at producing genre because they needed the market,” Wong said. “The local market didn’t support the productions. Most of the revenue came from the overseas market. The starting point for young filmmakers was always a genre film. That never bothered me. …The genre is basically a means. This is how I started working.”

Everything changed with the arrival of Bruce Lee, however. After returning to his native Hong Kong from is Hollywood stint as Kato in “The Green Hornet,” Lee introduced a new concept: “He’s young, he’s energetic, he’s also very charming, and he’s fearless.” Prior to Lee, Hong Kong kung fu movies centered on more mature stars and older characters who were more like teachers and who liked to lecture, Wong explained.

Due to his work in the U.S., Lee also had international appeal. “Overnight he becomes the biggest star in Hong Kong and around Asia and finally in the United States. No one was bigger than Bruce Lee before. … Bruce Lee was very unique. He came at the right time and with the right talents.”

It was, however, a wave of young filmmakers in the late 1970s who had studied in Europe and the U.S. that transformed Hong Kong cinema, Wong explained. Prior to that, big studios like Shaw Brothers had primarily shot their films in studios, but these young filmmakers embraced documentary techniques and took their cameras out onto the streets “to capture real aspects of the city and new storytelling.”

The massive success of John Woo’s “A Better Tomorrow” in 1986 triggered huge demand for gangster films, leading to Wong’s big break, 1988’s “As Tears Go By.”

“Instead of telling a story of two heroes, we are telling the story of losers who are trying to be heroes.”

Wong added, “I’ve been very, very lucky because at the time the industry was beginning its so-called golden age of Hong Kong filmmaking. There was a lot of money around, there was a lot of opportunity and people were encouraged to do something different, something interesting,” Wong explained, adding, “Even Chris Doyle came to Hong Kong.”

“And I never left,” Wong’s longtime cinematographer yelled from the audience. Doyle went on to praise the interpreter sitting on stage next to Wong: “I’ve never heard a more beautiful translation of his bulls***.”

Standing up later to answer a question about the challenges faced by actors working on Wong’s films, often with constantly changing scripts, Doyle paid tribute to the cast members who had regularly worked with the filmmaker, among them Maggie Cheung, Tony Leung Chiu-wai and Leslie Cheung.

“Our Maggies, and our Tonys and our Leslies, they don’t give a s***,” Doyle said. “They are there for us. It’s the most astonishing, beautiful thing. … I think it’s a different attitude – it’s changing in China, by the way, it’s changing very much. But in our films, people we’ve worked with, they’re not actors. They’re participants. They’re people who dare to go into this space. … The actors are there for us, not for themselves.”

On his 1997 romantic drama “Happy Together,” starring Leung and the late Cheung, Wong said he wanted to make a gay drama because he wasn’t sure if he would be allowed following Britain’s handover of Hong Kong to China that year. Searching for the farthest point on the globe from Hong Kong, Wong settled on Argentina as the setting for the film. Despite the far-off locale, “Happy Together” is very much about Hong Kong film, Wong said.

Wong went on to thank the Cannes Festival, which Frémaux also heads, for its support over the years and “most of all, it’s become the time for me to stop shooting my film. With the schedule, you have to send a print to Cannes and that’s the only reason we have to stop at that point.”

“But with ‘The Grandmaster’ you went to Berlin,” countered Frémaux.

“I’ll come back,” Wong replied.

Commenting on “The Grandmaster,” a 1930-set martial arts drama starring Leung, the director said that perhaps it “should be not just a film but should be given a bigger canvas.”

“I’m very happy – I’ve been very lucky to be able to do what I wanted to do. … In the future it is the same path, which is the work and challenge of making the films that I want. I think that will be the best future for me.”

A screening of Wong’s 1995 crime drama “Fallen Angels” followed the award ceremony.
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yitian



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



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Safran



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.institut-lumiere.org/festivallumiere/newsletter/236/contenu.html

Cool Applause thumbleft

Other WKW related links:
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2126288900718330&id=139629576050949

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1612380025466723&id=205345476170192

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/10/wong-kar-wai-amazon-tong-wars-blossom-television-1201889648/
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yitian



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing Helga! What a collection of info you found love

In addition, thanks for the YouTube link, this is the original video link from ARTE website in connection to the Lumiere Award (just in case people can't watch YouTube from certain part of the world Very Happy )

C’est quoi Tony Leung ? - Blow Up - ARTE
Blow Up, l'actualité du cinéma (ou presque) - ARTE
Published on Oct 10, 2017
Le Prix Lumière décerné à Lyon à Wong Kar Wai nous a aussi donné envie de revenir sur la carrière fastueuse de son acteur fétiche Tony Leung.

[English translation by Google (sort of):
What is Tony Leung? - Blow Up - ARTE
Blow Up, movie news (or almost) - ARTE
Published on Oct 10, 2017
The Lumière Prize at Lyon for Wong Kar Wai also made us want to return to the lavish career of his favorite actor Tony Leung.] Razz love

http://cinema.arte.tv/fr/blow-up/cest-quoi-tony-leung

(YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-csi3_lOeYs&t=413s)
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Safran



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks for your supportingly help yitian ! flower

....and a last one from my side ( I hope it works Wink )
Tony on this very special screen love
http://www.institut-lumiere.org/festivallumiere/newsletter/238/contenu.html love
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Tin-Yau



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting all these goodies!
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Safran



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 3:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The crowning conclosion !
5000 people enjoyed the restaured copy of
"In The Mood for Love "
salute Applause Waving cheers

http://www.festival-lumiere.org/actualit%C3%A9s/merci.html
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yitian



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Safran wrote:
The crowning conclosion !
5000 people enjoyed the restaured copy of
"In The Mood for Love "
salute Applause Waving cheers

That's over ten thousand eyes (consider some people wear spectacles) staring at Tony and Maggie Laughing Laughing Laughing .
Thanks for sharing Giving a kiss .
BTW, I read somewhere else that 5 of WKW's films are currently under restoration Applause cheers .
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Tin-Yau



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yitian wrote:
BTW, I read somewhere else that 5 of WKW's films are currently under restoration Applause cheers .


Honestly I read this with mixed feelings.
I love to watch older movies just because they had been made with the technology that was available back then. Confused
Is it just me?
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